Here are our mentors of the week of the ASE year 2019-2020

During our Jaycee life, most of us had mentors, and most of us were, and still are, mentors.
The ASE board is running a project about mentoring, trying to encourage Senators to develop them as mentors.
Please share your experience in mentoring by answering the form at http://tiny.cc/aa9i8y. Thank you for your collaboration.

  

  

   10   Irina USIUKEVICH


# 64850   JCI Ukraine – JC Minsk

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

These were 2 remarkable JCI persons: Reginald Schaumans (the coach of my 14th Academy in Takamatsu (Japan) – needless to say about this fantastic person (RIP). It seems I could talk to him all my life… and Lars Hajslund, when he was not the JCI WP yet.

When Lars first came to Minsk, Belarus in 2001 I have told him that he will be the WP in few years. He impressed me (and all of us – JC Belarus team). In several years he became 2006 JCI WP. These 2 persons are absolutely different with age and temper, but they are both wise, honest and always had time to talk and give advice.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I do not think I can be a mentor. I do not think this can be learned. One should have a certain charisma, be respected and trusted by people. Then your one honest word can change somebody’s life.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Mind, reputation, sense of humour, compassion.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Honesty, trust. For mentors: do not teach! For mentees: divide everything said by 10 and trust your intuition!

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Saving time. The sooner young people get smart advice or see a vivid example, the faster they will achieve their goals.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

I cannot call this person « a mentor », but he gave me the main « kick » in my life. I was 24, working as a teacher of English at a secondary school, living with parents, lack of money… We were several girlfriends, who were visiting a small cafe in historical part of Minsk almost every evening, chatting, laughing, flirting – « wind in the mind »:-) In this place there was one very remarkable person, whom everybody called « Michael the Frenchman ». He was a jeweller – rather handsome man on about 50 years old. He was looking like mafia man (I am sure he was the one:-), sitting at the best table, talking just few words during the evening. One evening I was told by the waiter, that Michael has invited me to come to his table. I was excited and scared. The reason was very simple – he was interested in my earrings. These were really old and nice silver earrings, nice shape, shining, my aunt’s gift to me. He asked to have a look at them and after some examining, he explained the nature of their bright shining – they were made of so-called lead glass – the material from which the best fake diamonds are made. We talked the whole evening quite easily and friendly – about jewellery, arts, style, any. But at the end of the evening, unexpectedly, with very serious and almost angry voice he said: « You are already 24 years old and you still live with your parents, and you cannot fully support yourself. That’s shameful. Fix your life right now! » Then he left. That was shocking and unexpected after such a nice talk. We never spoke again, only greeted from afar. In 2 weeks, I have left my job at school, found better on in Belarusian-American Joint Venture, where my salary became 3 times higher and my life career began.

  

   09   Silva DOLMANE


# 70830   JCI Latvia – JC Riga

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I am not really sure that I got real JCI mentorship in my early JCI life. I was too active myself and made the road up to NP without real mentorship. For the international level I had mentorship on personal level not JCI.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I have never announced myself as a mentor, and never officially have participated in any mentorship program. However, I have always been open to my experience sharing and have helped with my contacts and information to anyone who was looking for that.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Experience and knowledge in certain area, passion for JCI, examples from their own life.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

For mentees – do not be afraid to ask questions and to open the doors to unknown. For mentors – find the right approach and the main need for mentee how to fulfil his interest and keep member for a long time.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

  1. Involvement in all levels, even if you are senator and not anymore active in projects;
  2. Experience and knowledge exchange are always good and maybe from this contact grows nice friendship or business partnership;
  3. Mentorship program is strengthening organisation. There is saying that the chain is as strong as the weakest part but if we improve our members, newcomers, we become all stronger.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Some external pushing is needed for most of us. Without that most probably I would not become NP and more than sure never International VP.

  

  

  

   08   Tom COMMEINE


# 72743   JCI Belgium – JC Houtland

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I’m blessed that one of my mentors has made it clear to me that we all need at least one, and preferably more, of these type of people in our life: heroes, mentors, role models, coaches and trainers. The most valuable lessons were repeated, with different words and different examples: « You have to BE before you can DO, you have to DO before you can HAVE », « You can have everything in life you want, if you’ll just help enough other people get what they want. » , « Do Whatever It Takes. » , « Never be a quitter. » , « Always celebrate wins. » , « Be positive, be better. » , « Whatever you can think about, whatever you can imagine, you can make happen. » , « Money is never the problem, resourcefulness is. » , « Wanna grow a big organisation? It’s simple: invite people. », « Meet strangers! Meet people you don’t know! Forget mama’s advice that said: don’t talk to strangers. Remember that EVERYTHING you want now is owned by someone else, by some stranger, by someone you still have to meet. » , « It’s not the problem that it’s too expensive, the problem is that you’re not earning enough, so be creative and find ways to earn more. » , « Live a life of abundance, not of scarcity. There’s abundance all over. » …

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Zig Ziglar motivated me back in 2001 during my training in Dusseldorf Germany. He said: « Don’t just start training our trainings. Become a mentor to the people you get in touch with, your family, your friends, your social network, your clients, and give, give, give. The laws of nature say that if you give, you’ll get back. The better you give, the better you’ll get back. Just stay yourself. You don’t want to become the next Zig Ziglar, be yourself, become your best self and create your own way. » I followed Zig Ziglar’s advice. I got from being a mentor the heart-warming feeling that people became much more successful, mostly without realising how much my influence contributed and, in many cases, still contributes to their success; and that’s awesome.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Giving attitude, good communication. Ideas + inspiration. Guidance.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Ideas, thoughts, can be life changing. Inspiration combined with ideas and action can turn into miracles.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Accelerated learning, creating, achieving.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

The many young people that were in touch with me over the years, that I shared ideas with, thoughts with, sparked ideas with them, inspired them and who have become member of JCI all over the world, from Norway to Australia and Singapore and have developed a most successful, wonderful personal life, family life and career. So, heart-warming. There are also the people I met in JCI and became friends over the years, and I’m sure I learned a lot from them as they did from me, without us naming it mentoring.

  

  

   07   Ilona GÖRÖG

# 53644   JCI Romania – JC Tirgu Mures

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I am grateful to Hans Richard Damli (JCI Norway) – he was the first who brought the idea of JCI in my hometown, Tirgu Mures, and mentored the creation of the first JCI LOM there. For the further development, the mentoring from JCEF members (France) was essential for me (for us), as we were the first JCI generation in Romania.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I could not say that I did proper mentoring till now, but I continued to support younger colleagues from Tirgu Mures and Brasov, when I concluded my membership at 41 yr., till, unfortunately, the organization stopped its activity.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

To be supportive, be open to share the experience, but also receptive for new needs/circumstances.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Trust, and mutual respect.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Creates bridges between generations, perpetuates values and organizational knowledge and strengthens the sense of belonging to a “family”.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Excursions and social evenings in Romania and France.

  

   06   Charlotte GREGORY

# 72298   JCI Malta  

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I was very lucky in having a great past National President that was my mentor, he is still very much a person that I look up to today. When I attended my first World Congress in Tunisia in 2009, I saw JCI in a totally different light and I wanted to learn so much more about the organization. Chris Mallia at the time was IPP and he had told me if you want to learn about the organization you need to attend GA, he sat next to me explained what each person’s role was, how the organization worked etc. I can truly say that although I had already been a JCI member for 3 years it is only then that I realized what a great organization JCI was. In the week we were there I tried to do as much as I can and I thank that for my first JCI Presenter course I had a great trainer that challenged me on so many levels. In all fairness I miss that time when for me the organization was a different one and self-development and networking was still the core of the organisation. I was then lucky to have met Mariella MacLeod we were co-chairs for the EC2014 held in Malta and her knowledge of the organisation and leadership changed me for the better.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I have never been asked officially to be a mentor of a JCI member however I think that I did help a few. Two people stand out for me, one was an entrepreneur who did not believe in himself and refused to participate in certain events as he was dyslexic and I remember helping him embrace it instead of fearing it. We met a few years ago, he now exports to more than 7 countries and he told me you remember that day that you helped me realize that I should embrace what I am, thank you so much I have moved on so much since then. To me that was one of the best JCI moments.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Empathy, a good listener, available, collaboration and truly believing in the organization.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Respect each other, if there is no respect the relationship will not work. Embrace the knowledge of your mentor as a mentee and the mentor should also embrace the mentee’s energy and inquisitiveness.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Self-development, friendships that last a life time, more active members, a stronger community.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Please see above.

  

   05   Toivo AALJA

# 53657   JCI Estonia – JC Tallinn

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Officially I haven’t had any mentors, but I have had many good advisors from all over the world in my JCI life and also in business life. Most I value is their advice to stay yourself, to listen your inner voice, keep clear mind and happy heart.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I have been asked to be a mentor for JCI member for period of one year. It was a good experience to feel trust and full acceptance. I could be a mentor in many fields like business administration, leadership, communication, sales, marketing etc.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Having practical experience in fields mentor is acting.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Relationship has to be very open, honest and kind for both.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Human value.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Unfortunately, I do not remember any specific memories.

  

  

   04   Claude DUPRAS

# 01889   JCI France & JCI Canada – JC Montreal  

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I joined the “Chambre de commerce des jeunes in Montréal” during a recruiting campaign. It was he French unit in the city. I met at that time members of the “Young Men Section of the Montreal Board of Trade” which was the name of the English unit in Montreal. That is where I met Phil Pugsley who created the JCI Senatorship. He was very impressive and he was the one who first motivated me to be very active in the movement. If I would not have been a member of the JCI my life would surely have been totally different.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I motivated many young men in Montreal to be become member of la “Jeune Chambre”. I delegated many responsibilities, helped them get elected to important posts, etc. For example, we invited Fidel Castro in Montreal a few months after he took power in Cuba. He accepted and came. More than 50 members where involved in the organization of the two day-visit. It was very intense and a great success. Our JCI unit had 1 500 members.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

To recognize the capacity and the needs of a new member. And to help him accordingly.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Confidence and follow up. Friendship evidently. Help them by example. Delegate responsibilities larger than the one they think they can handle.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

It is motivation and confidence in the future. Try to show them where they will be in a few years. Like at this time, a new unit is been created in Montreal. The leaders came to talk to me. I tried to convince them and show them where they would be in a few years as individuals.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Phil Pugsley organized small reunions regularly to discuss the importance of confidence in oneself and showed examples of success. For me public speaking was an example. In the beginning, I was shy to talk in public or to a group to give my opinion or propose an idea. A few later I was talking to groups of 500 persons. I did not believe it but it was true.

  

  

   03   Alma KARABEG

# 76398   JCI Norway – JC Evolution Trondheim

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I did not have a dedicated official mentor, but in my contact with experienced people I asked for advice and some of them functioned are regular advice-providers. Mostly, I needed an experienced and wise person for discussion. The advice I got inspired me and made me take my next steps. I think mentoring gives courage. Many times, we have the answer ourselves, but we need to be encouraged to pursue them too.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

When I functioned as a mentor it was to share my knowledge and experience. It should be valuable to more people than just myself.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

It is important not to influence the mentee and not to lead the mentee to take action that I would take if I was in their position. A mentor needs to stay neutral, share his/her experience and ask guiding questions to help the mentee to clarify what he/she wants to do. A mentor needs to have patience and should not use the mentee to achieve his/her own unlived dreams.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Mutual respect for mentee and mentor is important. It is time-consuming to be a mentor so it is important to have clear boundaries how much time is available.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

The mentee can learn faster about JCI from a mentor, in particular if aiming for some positions. JCI can become a stronger network due to mentoring.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Mostly remembering different stories and narratives from others experience.

  

   02   Marc GIMFERRER

# 70235   JCI Catalonia – JC Barcelona

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

It helped me to understand better the organization and its dynamics, which gave me confidence to pursue higher goals within JCI.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Helping others and making them grow is what inspires me. I could mentor on JCI as NGO, JCI Catalonia specifics, project management and leadership.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Experience, knowledge, empathy, open minded.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Trust each other, gain confidence and reassure confidentiality also of what is being discussed between the two of us.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

A lot of value as in our organization each member change roles every year and the knowledge is easy and quick to gain, but also quick to lose as the members can disappear quite fast as in a few years you may give a lot to the organization and often he or she gets burned out and could disappear quite suddenly from the association, which is a huge loss of know-how and organizational culture and values.

  

  

  
   01   Patrizia RONCONI

# 49289   JCI Italy – JC Varese

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Since my first meeting in JCI, I had Senators (mentors) who welcomed me, made that I felt part of the group and explained to me the organization, its goals, its values, its structure, the program and the projects of the LOM.

They were so good at passing on their passion and their love for this association that I immediately became passionate about it.

They also helped me to learn how to work on a project, they supported me with advices on how to deal with « project planning » which was something really new more than 35 years ago!

Other mentors helped me the first years with public speaking, team building, leadership, how to found a LOM, trainer skills and leadership skills.

I especially remember a mentor, a professional trainer, a Senator from Belgium, who taught me a lot in the field of trainings. We conducted together a training in Tarragona (JCI Catalunya). He gave me so many advices, he motivated me and he considered me as a professional trainer asking for my opinion on what we were doing. And that was my first international training! That was an awesome experience, especially if we consider that nowadays my profession is to be a trainer!

Everything would have been different if these people would not have been there!  I don’t know if I would have achieved the goals I have achieved, but certainly I would not have reached the level of competence that I have reached.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I was inspired to be a mentor thanks to the mentors who helped me at the beginning and all the times I needed their help in my JCI career. To become a mentor was, in my opinion, the best way to say « thank you » to what they did for me.

Being a mentor gave me and continues to give me the enormous satisfaction of being able to pass on to others what I learned both in JCI and professionally and to see people grow in JCI and professionally.

Due to my experience in JCI and in my professions, I could be a mentor in several fields like: trainings, leadership/management/organization, communication/networking, HR skills evaluation and recruitment.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Empathy, good communication skills, good ability to explain things, good ability to interact with young people, and – of course – knowledge and deep experience in some skills and good advices to transmit.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

The most significant: trust and respect of both sides.

To mentors: tell young members that you are available to answer questions or for advices.

To mentees: don’t hesitate to ask questions, ask for advices.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

A huge value, a unique value, that can hardly be found in other associations.

It’s a complete WIN-WIN situation where everybody comes out enriched. The mentor still feels involved in the association and the mentee found a point of reference to help him to grow.