Here are our mentors 2019-2020

During our Jaycee life, most of us had mentors, and most of us were, and still are, mentors.
The ASE board is running a project about mentoring, trying to encourage Senators to develop them as mentors.
Please share your experience in mentoring by answering the form at http://tiny.cc/aa9i8y. Thank you for your collaboration.

   45   Leoš KUBÍČEK


# 77274   JCI Czech Republic

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I did not have a mentor in JCI.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I am a professional coach and mentor. One of my main values is to help other. I like to see how people grow. My field is personal and business development.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Empathy, self-reflection, listening, open mind.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Trust, cooperation, open mind.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Mentoring helps new members to integrate them in JCI. For mentors it is an option, how to help JCI to grow and to be the biggest organization of young leaders. For mentee it is the opportunity how to grow personally and to be beneficial for community and JCI too.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

I feel well if I helped my JCI friend to solve membership problem between two members and he solved it well – both stay in JCI and they are still friends.

   44   Marina SEDOVA-BAKHENSKAYA


# 73370   JCI Russia   JC Saint Petersburg

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Mentoring has been very helpful to me during my first JCI Steps in 2008. When we started founding the JCI Chapter in St. Petersburg, Bernhard Weidinger’s mentoring was very helpful. I got inspiration and understanding of the JCI idea. Without it, there wouldn’t be any chapter.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I was a mentor for several local presidents, it is always a very pleasant feeling to have an answer to the questions that arise, because I already experienced this experience. In my professional life, I often become a mentor for start-up founders and entrepreneurs. Fields: entrepreneurship, project management, leading teams, events organizing.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Patience, give the right to make a mistake, active listening.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

mentees?

Respect and friendship.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Continuity, transfer of values, the possibility of development based on experience.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Once a member of JCI and my friend came to me. He wanted to start an entrepreneurship project and asked for advice. We talked for many hours. And after our meeting, he changed his life and began an entrepreneurial project. I’m glad I could give a little courage to take the first step.

   43   Alexis FARY


# 73575   JCI Belgium

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

It’s very difficult to answer this question because, since the beginning of my Jaycee life, as a young member or senator, every talking, every experience, every people, taught me a lot of things and ideas. So, I could say that I had a lot of mentors. In my mind, some of them: Marc De Tienne and his passion to story-telling every training, Annie and Jacques Arnal, at the international level, Reynold Dumalte, as a Jaycee friend to discuss about serious topics and share ideas in a « French-touch » style, Tom Commeine, one of our former NP, who accepted me as a member of his national staff and who taught me a lot about managing a very diverse team. Actually, there are so many people…

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

It’s also difficult for me to see me as a mentor because in my mind it’s not a « function » or a role to play. It’s my way to live. Trying to teach people, to advise them, to share experience is for me so natural. A lot of people are trying to do great things to be in the history, but a lot of them forgot that their first responsibility, as a human being, and this is a thing that everybody is able to do, is to teach others what they learned themselves throughout the time. At the end of my life, I would consider that I managed it if other people learned things thanks to me :-).

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

The most important for me is not to forget why we do things. Questioning ourselves is for me the only ground where other qualities could prosper.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Respect in our differences is for me the most important condition in relationship between mentor and mentee. While being mentors, we should be able to learn also from the mentee. Too many times I saw mentors saying to people: « You must do like this » instead of asking « Do you have any reason to do things like you do? » or « Do you want to share with me your point of view? ». So, my suggestion is at each time, do not hesitate to transform yourself from mentor to mentee and from mentee to mentor!

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Mentoring is an opportunity to create strong links between people. Strong links lead the organisation to develop itself as a human organisation sharing human-based values, and to be very responsive in this fast-changing world. JCI is a unique field where you can grow with the ideas of the others and is a « must » when facing worldwide challenges.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

What makes me very happy is when ideas or networks that I share are followed by action or good friendships, … I have in mind a special moment. For every other people, it could be nothing but for me it was the beginning of a long-time fellowship between members. I remember to have met a guy in a national convention in France. I didn’t know him before but he introduced himself as a Jaycee member and he wanted to share some ideas with a Belgian LOM. He knew me as the most-well-known Belgian-French guy lol. So, when I came in back in Belgium, I asked one of our LOM if they wanted to be in. The years that followed the LOM created some links, friendships, projects together and twinned. What makes me happy is when the little spark that I give becomes a big fire :-). A second memory, my special one, is about my best friend relationship in France with Jérôme Decorte. We shared a lot of things together and I don’t even know who is the mentor or the mentee amongst us, lol. The first time I met him, it was the morning following the night when I was pinned as a brand-new senator. So, I decided to go to this training session where I subscribed in, organised by Jérôme. When I was introduced, I had to do my first speech as a senator speaking to French members. And it was the beginning of a lifetime friendship with Jérôme who laughed so much about challenging me so quickly after the surprise I lived.

   42   Jonna ENGBLOM


# 74115   JCI Finland

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

During my active JC member years, I did not have an official mentor, but got support and kind of coaching/mentoring from many members and Senators. I have always liked the idea and the way how we lift and encourage others in JCI and also work-related matters. Personally, it has helped me to understand better the options forward. I have also been able trust that there are always some persons to support me when needed (and yeah, I have needed them).

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

After hearing experiences of mentoring I became interested in it. I have been mentoring JCs and co-workers during the past 10 years. Being a mentor gives opportunity to share your experiences and knowledge, learn, understand others and see other perspective to life, work etc. I am always ready to mentor if we can agree together on the target, where my background and experiences can help the mentee.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Readiness to listen and understand other’s point of view, willingness to interact and share own experiences & knowledge, enthusiasm to learn also him-/herself from mentee. It is also important to agree in the beginning on the targets, timetable and shared rules for mentoring.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Trust between each other is the most significant. You both should be ready to open your thoughts & dreams & obstacles and discuss also challenging and sometimes painful cases and matters with each other.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

It can help to strengthen your personal and professional identity, enlarge your network and give trust for the future.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

With one of my mentees we took part in playful completion as a team. We had so much fun and it sure helped us to understand each other better.

   41   Emanuele COLOMBO


# 70422   JCI Italy   JC Varese

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I’ve never had actually a real mentor but of course during all these years in JCI I met some people from whom I learned a lot and by whom I was inspired. This “mentoring” helped me to fully lived JCI experience by the drop and sometimes it was useful for my life in general.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I hope that in the years I was able to transmit to others some of my enthusiasm, passion, assertiveness and transparency, some of the necessary skills to be active member of an organization like JCI and to successfully lead a team. I think I could be a mentor in networking, organizing events and travels. And why not wine tasting?… 😉

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

The most important quality in my opinion are listening, sincerity and leading by doing.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

I think that trust and personal tuning are the most significant to build a special relationship between mentor and mentee.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

The most important values mentoring to JCI for me are solidarity, the will to grow and the consciousness that a better world is possible.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Not one in particular but the feeling that, in JCI as well as in life, there are always situations where you feel mentor or mentee, where you learn from someone or where you inspire someone. It’s the magic of life. For sure my participation in ASPAC 2018 in Kagoshima was very significant in both ways.

   40   Dmitry AFANASYEV


# 74797   JCI Russia   JC Moscow

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

It is very important to have mentors in such crazy time. I had more than one in the past. They helped me to go through difficult interesting situations. I feel more comfortable when I have a mentor. And my businesses have a lot of additional and useful advices.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

It is very important to share your experience with your mentee, because it gives you also more involvement and deeper analysis of information.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Experience, energy, contacts.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Like a friend but with positive distance.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

All JCI values and experience can go to the future of our organisation!

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

My mentor became my mentee in IT. 😉

   39   Ana NIKOLOVA


# 77764   JCI Bulgaria   JC Sofia

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I have had different types of mentoring in my life – organized, following a specific plan and goal of mentoring (e.g. in the process of improving my skills as a trainer I work with an experienced one who helps me along the way in order to improve certain skills) and unorganized that has no clear plan or specific goal to reach (apart from becoming better), which I get from wonderful people who have been my advisers and inspirers at different stages of my life. Many of them in recent years are people I have met in JCI and this is one of the greatest assets that I have found in this organization – people with experience and willingness to help others to grow and develop. These people consciously or not helped me to make difficult decisions, to make important choices. I do not know what would have been without their help, but I know that with them every step I took was easier to make.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Being a mentor is a great opportunity to pass own knowledge and experience while learning about others and helping them to grow. The mentoring is a special type of partnership between a person with knowledge and experience and a person ready to learn. At the same time, the mentor can learn a lot from the mentee, which can give different perspective and way of thinking and seeing thinks. For me, being a mentor is a rewarding activity, because it is a great pleasure to be important part of the growth of someone else, as well as great opportunity to deliver your knowledge and experience to someone else and make sure it will continue to be used and developed. As a mentor, I feel confident in two areas – Project Management, which is my professional field and Effective Leadership – which is something that I build on while being part of JCI and believe that can help other at least to find their own way to lead in their own field and life.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

For me the most important quality of a good mentor is to care and be empathic. This way, the mentor can really understand the mentee and find the best possible way to support him/her on the way to become better. Apart from that I believe the following qualities are very important:

– Willingness to share skills, knowledge, and expertise.

– Be enthusiastic about the role as a mentor.

– Values learning and continue learning.

– Being objective and fair.

– Being approachable, available, and active listener.

– Treats others with respect.

– Encourages one to step out of his/her comfort zone.

– Has positive attitude and acting as a positive role model.

– Take a personal interest in the mentoring relationship.

– Be an expert on the field of mentoring.

– Exhibits enthusiasm in the field of expertise.

– Provides guidance and constructive feedback.

– Values the opinions and initiatives of others.

– Motivates by setting a good example.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

The most significant thing in the relationship between mentor and mentee for me is the trust and respect between both. An environment of trust and mutuality must be established before any effective relationship can take place in order for the mentor and mentee to become acquainted with each other. Mutual respect in another vital part of mentor-mentee relationship. Both need to be willing to listen and learn.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Mentoring is a great way to share expertise and knowledge. Therefore, in an organisation like JCI, mentoring assists with the recruitment, retention and progression of members, and helps maximise their potential – both for mentor, who learns how to help others to grow and for mentee, who has a strong support on his/her way of skills development.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

One I remembered when I read this question a memory of being a mentee, is when I was in high school, there was one teacher that was kind of my mentor during my last year in school. She helped me to decide where to go after graduation in terms of professional field, since there were so many opportunities out there and I was like « I want it all ». And what she did was to show me which are my strong points and where they can fit in all the opportunities, so to find the thing that I will be interested to do at the same time to have the skills to do it good. Now I find this help so important, because I see many young people lost in that and often choosing something which is just not for them. So, now I try to help other to find exactly what they want to do, but not to choose, because it is trendy or because someone tell them to do it.

   38   Ovidiu MEGAN


# 70035   JCI Romania   JC Timișoara

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

As founder of JCI Romania I didn’t have any mentor in my country but… Here is the power of network! We received a lot of support and mentorship from colleagues from JCI Germany and JCI Belgium. They have helped us to create the local and national organisation, to organize a Danube Conference and to attend a world congress where every member can see the power of this wonderful organisation.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

For me a real mentor was Thomas Emmerling (2003 JCI Germany NP). Being a mentor supposes to have a zoom out from every task, to analyse the problem and to advise the mentee who is fully involved in that problem. I can be a mentor for Romanian members in Design Thinking and Social entrepreneurship.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

The empathy, problem solving, experience and vision.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

The most significant is the empathy with the mentees and with the target group. The mentors should understand the context and the mentees’ problems. The mentees should look for mentors who are facing similar problems.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Our organisation supposes to learn leadership by doing. Some leadership skills are native some others should be learned from other people with more experience and practice during the JCI projects and during the job for local, national or international board. During these challenges the support received from mentors is very important.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

I don’t remember. I am too old 😉

   37   Sotiroula KONIKKOU


# 70335   JCI Cyprus

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Even though I found out about JCI through a post on Facebook (due to upcoming elections on that year) and not by a person, in the early days of my membership I met exceptional people and especially a girl from JCI Limassol who was an inspiration for me! Getting to know her better I learned that JCI members share the same values as I do and that being a member of JCI would make me a better person. She had a sparkle in her eyes every time she was explaining us what JCI is all about! I guess meeting her and the other members was a key point for me entering the amazing world of JCI which looks like a life time goal!

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Being a mentor was not a conscious decision. JCI has been a part of my life for the last 12 years and talking about JCI is like talking about daily and upcoming plans of my life! Becoming a Senator after the end of my National Presidency gave me the opportunity to meet new members and share my experience with them. It’s always a pleasure to share my knowledge and my passion for JCI and happy to help in any way every time someone is asking for help.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

A mentor should be a great listener. Should be a person who gets joy out of giving. Most of all should be someone who has the values of a leader, a strong personality with a kind heart.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

A mentor and a mentee should act like true friends, so trust is the most significant part of this relationship. A mentor should know when to step back and give space and a mentee should not be afraid to ask for help or advice.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Mentoring is the meaning of learning by example and represents the satisfaction of giving and receiving in the same time.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

A great memory for me was to see my mentee on stage for the first time and overcome her fear for public speaking!

   36   Friedhelm WACHS


# 62578   JCI Germany   JC Leipzig

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I had no mentor in JCI – the one we could have had – a Senator – was an old arrogant man only implementing his own ideas.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

My experience is that being a mentor is like being a man in a relationship – the mentee/woman chooses what they take from your offer and what not.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

To be patient and not to pave the way for the mentee but give him tools to do it himself.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Mentor: To be patient and not to pave the way for the mentee but give him tools to do it himself. Mentee: ask what you want to know and be always the boss in this relation.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

That depends totally to the mentor and his quality. Selfish mentors endanger JCI with their low quality. In the best sense it could help them to become a better leader.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

I love it when mentees, years later, tell me what was the most important piece of advice: once one came during a party in a JCI conference, hugged me heavily and said: I will never forget your advice in that first timers seminar when you said “Carl, never forget your company while being in JCI. It’s still there when your time is over here “.

   35   Anita van VEEN


# 71230   JCI The Netherlands   JC ‘t Sticht

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I did not have a mentor, but learned a lot from the projects I developed with other Jaycees. All about leadership, training and leading a change.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I was a mentor for several new Jaycees. I liked to make new Jaycees enthusiastic and take care they took action as well. I could be a mentor about leading the change and training.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Listening, share your experiences and give your energy.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Be in contact! Both take care, you speak each other regularly.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Learning and growth.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

People who had another mentor, who said Anita was the real coach, because she realized I became enthusiastic and took action.

 

   34   Joost BOERS


# 61312   JCI The Netherlands   JC De Maaskant

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Actually, I had the experience of a menteeship in JCI from one particular person – but in the trainer’s development programme I received coaching from several people. Currently, in my business mentorship is important. In both cases, it helped me to know about potential pitfalls, and how I could build on mistakes other people already made instead of having to experience them again.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I had the experience of being a mentor both from JCI and my current business. My inspiration in JCI is by Jolanda Troelstra-Luinstra – we did a lot together in the train-the-trainer programme in the 90s. Being a mentor, it is rewarding to see people grow and discover ways to do things that they probably wouldn’t have experienced (that easily) themselves. But also, I appreciate from learning from the insights of the mentees, as they bring different points of view. I could be a mentor on working with international teams and people and this probably best in a business area working with people.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

I think it’s important to be emphatic, be able to listen – and to ask questions challenging the mentee to think outside and a bit further – however without losing the connection with the experience already present.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Keep an open eye for each other. Keep in touch – however this does not need to be on a daily basis. If you want to achieve something, it’s needed to give the relationship a structure in the way that you have contact on at least scheduled moments, added to this ‘grid’ on the spot arrangements. It’s important for both be and to stay open to learn from each other!

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

To JCI: a stronger organisation and power ‘from within’; consolidated experience and knowledge; to the mentor and the mentee: extended experience, network, knowledge. Specifically, for the mentee: access to experience and a ‘sounding board’; for the mentor: staying in touch with another generation and probably another professional with different insights and contacts.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

With Jolanda, we had great moments during the training, during seminars and congresses – and a lasting friendship. Actually, it led to me being more open and starting my own business.

  

   33   Viggo HANSEN


# 16575   JCI Denmark

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Did not have any mentor. In my time we learned by doing and learned from what we did right and did wrong! Nowadays JCI is working differently. No projects, but a lot of seminars, academies etc. It is not any longer « learning by doing » but « learning by sitting down and listening », which may be one of the reasons why the membership is decreasing and decreasing. JCI is not any longer the unique organisation it was, simply because we are doing the wrong things. In addition, many seniors and senators who did not fulfil their ambitions when they were juniors, are now interfering in the junior’s activities, such as so-called political advisors, academy teachers and an unbearable we-know-better attitude.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Have never had any wish to be a mentor, but have always been ready to answer/help when asked.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Not to interfere in the Juniors activities. If invited as a speaker to a chapter meeting for instance then don’t tell them what to do, but tell them what you did to achieve your goals, and where you succeeded and failed.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Same as the preceding question.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

It is a completely wrong concept, and gives no value what so ever. It may advance the death of JCI.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

No.

  

   32   Aud Schjødt FREDRIKSEN


# 48767   JCI Norway

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Good advice and good questions that helped me to think for myself. I got a good start and a good understanding of the organization. I made friends for life.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Always educational and enjoyable. It is inspiring and getting to know the new or younger. Maybe area course holder or networking.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

A good listener and ask good questions.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Understanding of the task. Then mentor must build the advice on the mentee’s mission and goals. The mentor must not take over. Mentee must listen with open mind.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Lessons and experience are brought on. The mentor gets back from his/her experience and still learns a lot him/herself. Mentee benefits from the experience of others and progresses faster. Both get new acquaintances and grow the network.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Lots of fun memories.

  

   31   Michael MÜLLNER


# 63855   JCI Austria

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

At JCI meetings I also learned to take other people’s perspectives. This has always given me a comprehensive view of a problem and helped me to solve it. In my life would be definitely a lot different. Especially in business life my company would never have taken these ways without having the experiences of being a mentee or a mentor at JCI. I have a small handcraft company located in Vienna, but with my carpentry I have been inside the airplane business for 14 years now and I’m starting my other part of handcraft business, surfaces on glass now in tradeshows in Shanghai, New York and Paris.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I was inspired to be a mentor because I saw the advancement of knowledge and the change in the people I taught. It was also very inspiring for me to see this transformation within a very short time and to see the successes in the future.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

The most important thing for me is to tell things from practice. In every area of ​​learning, things can be more easily taken up if they are backed up with examples that everyone can use, that everyone has already experienced or that someone can imagine. Explaining abstract things is always more difficult if they are not backed up with practical examples or applications.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

I find it very important to tell from my own experiences, so that the mentee can best put himself in my position and thus also in his position. Here again, the previously said, practical and experienced always creates images and has taken light ones.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

I think learning is one of the most valuable values ​​at JCI, here the generations grow together, here values ​​and knowledge are imparted and manifested with practical applications.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

My more than ten years of work and managing and directing the COC-Academy, founded in Austria, was an impressive and uplifting feeling every year. People from all over the world came to us and left this academy as completely different personalities. The great thing is that we are still connected and a small worldwide network of mentors and mentees has emerged, where many graduates of the COC-Academy have advanced in the highest levels of the JCI organization!

  

   30   Victor GALLAVARDIN


# 75831   JCI Luxemburg

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I am a JCI Luxemburg member since 2006. Over those years, I had opportunities to participate and to manage different projects. For each project stage, I had the opportunity to be supported and advised by JCI members and senators. In 2017, when I started my own company, I proposed to some people to be part of an unofficial advisory board. Those persons help to take the right decision and propose alternative ways to solve problems.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

To be a mentor is the opportunity to share experiences and attitudes. It is a unique opportunity to meet persons with different ideas and ways of doing things… trying to solve a problem. The mentor’s role is to be realistic, draw the potential issues and share opportunities.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

The most important qualities for a mentor are listening, be frank and supportive.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Relationship between mentor and mentee need to be short, planned and periodic.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Mentoring at JCI opportunity is a unique experience to meet new members and senators, to create links on concrete experience and to boost projects.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

It depends the point of view, sometime people think to have an idea for the first time. It was a great experience to explain why I failed and the action to take in order to not repeat the same mistake! It is not very valuable for the mentor… but it helps the mentee!

  

   29   Konstantinos VARSOS


# 44272   JCI Greece

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

The “First timers” program at the Birmingham EC 2003 with Ulrich Kistner and Clare Ashton gave me the chance to become mentor and that reminded me of my first steps in JCI as a mentee by Per Eric Sundstrom, JCI VP from Finland in 1984.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

My experience as a mentor is great. I met young people and I became friend with them not only mentor. I am still playing football with them at the EC’s tournaments and I am interested in continuing to do that.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

The most important quality is to treat young people as equal with you and give them the possibility to express their ideas and beliefs.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

The mentor must give a gentle motivation to the mentee from his own experience in the JCI family.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

The value of the respect to the young generation that brings a trust between us and creates a bridge to the gap of the old and the new ones.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

I have known a Tunisian, a Swiss and a young Jaycee from Malta that I join at every conference since 2003 and I am very happy that they became great leaders in JCI and successful in their personal life.

 

   28   Penelope PAPAKONSTANTOPOULOU-VARSOU


# 47440   JCI Greece

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I was a mentee in Liege 1987 where I did “Training for trainers”. It was a great experience because due to the mentoring I was inspired and I decided to learn more about the JC and become a life member.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Ulrich Kistner inspired me to become a mentor at the “First timers” program in Birmingham and thereafter during this program at the European conferences I continued to be a mentor. Being a mentor is great as you come closer to young people who want to learn about the JCI. As I speak fluently French, I mostly was mentor of Francophones.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

The mentor must be fully aware of the JCI and the Jaycee Creed to be able to approach young people and have the ability to understand them. To be aware of the organization JCI and the profits you have had personally through the training, networking etc.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

The trust that will be developed between the mentor and the mentee is very essential and will be followed by recognition.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

JCI as a worldwide training organization for young people should give great importance to the mentoring because in this way it appreciates the Senators’ experiences and the mentee learns from these experiences.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Kostas and I made strong relationships with a Tunisian, Maltese and Swiss first-timers that we are still meeting at the conferences and have become very dynamic leaders at the JCI LOM and NOM positions. When Mike Ashton came to Greece before the EC in Thessaloniki (1996) did a real mentoring and gave us the know-how concerning an event like that. He was a great man with a rare humour.

  

   27   Jean-Claude FÉRAUD


# 14105   JCI France – JC Nîmes   JCI President 1975

In French, the definition of the term « mentor » is: « a wise counsellor who acts as a guide to someone » and I must confess that I have reservations about the ability of anyone to aspire to be a « guide » for a third party. My answers therefore refer to the notion of exemplarity in preference to that of a guide.

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I have never had a « mentor » strictly speaking, but I have been fortunate to be able to draw inspiration at various stages of my life from the exemplary example of certain people whom I have had the privilege of working with and who have influenced my commitments.

Abbé Pierre’s action has had a lasting influence on their orientation. Thanks to his example, I realized that the essential motivation should not be the search for the satisfaction of one’s own ambition but risk-taking and action for the realization of an ideal. What counts is therefore not what we seek for ourselves but the contribution we can make to achieve this ideal that is beyond us.

Within JCI, one person in particular is a living example of our principles as expressed in our Creed: L.A. Roy Banarsee, JCI President in 1973, with whom I have remained in close contact to this day. We have worked together for many years. His 1988 speech at the Sydney world congress remains for me a summit of Junior Chamber. Looking back today allows us to appreciate his prophetic vision, the pertinence and accuracy of his analysis and the intelligence of his vision. Unfortunately, he preached in the desert, and today we are paying a heavy price for not having been able to listen to him then. Without him I would never have had the journey that I have had within our organization. Without his support, I would never have been the first Frenchman elected JCI President.

In France, the personality that has marked me the most is undoubtedly Paul Dini (# 16820). By his intelligence, his clear-sightedness, his managerial qualities, his sense of duty and his loyalty, he was a very great servant of JCI France.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

As I said in my initial remark, I never thought I could be anyone’s mentor. That would have required me to consider myself personally as an exemplary person. Which, for me, would be the height of self-importance.

My maternal grandfather, originally from the Swiss Ticino, used to say, « Say makes you laugh, do makes you shut up ». Like him, I believe that only our actions can be evaluated. If there are some of my achievements that have motivated others, I can only be glad about that. But it is these actions that are to be taken into account, not my person. If they have been a source of inspiration for some how can I not be flattered but, in this case, they can refer to the action carried out without the personality of his initiator bringing an extra motivation to an audience to whom his name means nothing anymore. The essential thing is therefore to serve without wanting to use it or to be used!

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

In view of the above, you will understand that the exemplary nature of my work lies essentially in the action, and his author must be erased behind it. Humility, a sense of listening, the ability to know how to enrich ourselves with our mutual differences, must be our prerogative. Let us leave the choice of discourse to politicians, let us concentrate on action in the service of the formation of our members through the realization of services to our respective communities. It is in this way that, by affirming the authenticity of our formation, we will be able to play an exemplary role.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

My logic, far from the notion of a mentor, will answer this question by addressing the relationships between leaders and members of an organization such as ours. For it is at the level of these leaders that our search for exemplarity must be situated.

Our Creed says « We believe that government should be of laws rather than of men ». It is imperative that those who lead our organization apply to themselves the principles they advocate. Shouldn’t we conclude that it is not enough to be exemplary, it is also necessary for potential « mentees » to be mentally receptive?

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

When I joined Junior Chamber, it was defined to me as « a movement of training through action of young leaders under 40 years of age ». It is therefore this capacity to train our members through actions in the service of their communities that we will give them both a personal experience and an introduction into their environment that will enable them to pursue civic engagement individually.

This definition was simple, comprehensive and attractive. This must be the message to give back to our organization its ability to attract to it young people who wish to serve their respective communities by learning from the experiences of other young people who have gone before them. In this way, a chain was formed whose strength is measured by the strength of the weakest of its links, the strong have every interest in strengthening the weakest without the latter feeling humiliated for all that. There is no charity in this but simple solidarity in the respect of individuals.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

At this point let me mention an anecdote from Graham Sinclair, 1971 JCI President. This sturdy « All Black » liked to recall that when he returned from his election as President, he proudly announced to his son, « Dad has been elected world President! « he received a laconic reply: « So what? ».

  

   26   Herbert EWERS


# 58966   JCI Germany – JC Lübeck

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

When I joined JCI in 1992 there was no real mentorship in my chapter. We started it for new members when I was in the chapter board.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Working internationally for JCI showed me the possibilities which were offered by our great organization specially at conferences and congresses. When the ASE run the first timer project at the World Congress in Osaka 2010, I had the pleasure to be chosen as the mentor for 5 first timer members from JCI Hong Kong. I guided them through the congress and every evening we discussed their experiences. Until today I still have contact to all 5 members, 3 are still active.
For me it was a great experience to discuss with first timers about their expectations and the knowledge they already brought from their NOM.

I served as mentor at some more first timer programs until JCI took the first timer programme away from the ASE which I think was a pity. From my point of view the opportunities for young members out of a mentorship are quite underestimated.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Knowledge about JCI, ability just to listen, ability to accept that things changed since we (mentors) were active Jaycees, being openminded, accepting different cultures, taking time for the mentee and keeping in touch.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Being openminded, accepting different cultures, taking time for the mentee and keeping in touch.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Mentorship can help to give young members a better understanding for JCI, the vision and mission and make the possibilities which JCI offers more transparent. For the mentor it is the chance to still have connection to active members.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

When the ASE run the first timer project at the World Congress in Osaka 2010, I had the pleasure to be chosen as the mentor for 5 young first timer members from JCI Hong Kong. I guided them through the congress and every evening we discussed their experiences. Until today I still have contact to all 5 members, 3 are still active.

  

   25   Kevin HIN


# 71282   JCI Monaco   JCI Secretary General

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I have never officially been part of a mentoring project but have received advice from different people at different stages in my career, not necessarily people who were older than me. It helped me a lot in my JC career.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I can be a mentor in leadership, JCI knowledge, sales/marketing/growth. I enjoy nurturing young talents and letting them unleash their potential but remaining themselves, not into clones of me.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Analysing needs and helping them specifically on that, not being overbearing or pushing one’s own agenda.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Listening on both ends, addressing expectations from the start, having clear timelines and goals.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Furthering the organisation and helping JCI to grow, same for the mentor and the mentee.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Not really as I’ve never been a formal mentor but always happy to see new members I’ve given advice to rise to great positions a few years later.

  

   24   George ZVIRID


# 71035   JCI Ukraine – JC Kiev

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Patience and self-confidence, wise short books. My best mentors are clever people who try to an employee in my company and I’m mentoring by them on interview. I asked candidates what books or people did the most impact on you in your life. JCI is the best place and the best people who volunteer to change their place of leave and country. People who chose this role already are best ever.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

When you help other people by your best experience in leadership you receive real friends and understand better your experience and situation in overall. I could good at mentoring about developing ideology of JCI in post-communist countries. At least I spent a lot of time working on it and mentored many national presidents.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Listen and understand what the person said and what he/she didn’t say. Sincerity in relation to the main motives of the mentees.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Trust to each other. Keeping trust till end of the life.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Mentoring is most important. As far as JCI is a network and members expect from our network a personal growth.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

My follower, national president 2009 Dmitry, doubted to invest his time in being the next national president, even the night before the election. But I found good words to motivate him and being the best president of our NOM and be a much better person one year later after it.

  

   23   Magi SENSERRICH GUITART


# 74136   JCI Catalonia

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

My experience as a mentee began in 2003, when I attended my first course in JCI. At the end of the course, an important Senator shared with me his stories in JCI. I remember how he made me feel. He was enthusiastic during his speech and he transmitted his passion. After that course, he guided me, and I was involved in different projects. Seventeen years later, I am still active in JCI.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I remember in 2008 when I was local president and three new members joined JCI. I realized that they needed to learn a lot of things about JCI. It was my duty to guide them. Few years later, one of them was a great local president.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

For me, a mentor is a referent for mentees. The mentor has to be a good example and inspire the mentee to dream more, to do more. Finally, the mentor has to ask them the proper questions in the proper moment.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Respect each other. The mentor should avoid using condescending or judgmental language and the mentee should be humble.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

In my opinion, the mentoring process in JCI is an act of generosity for both.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

When I want to measure if the mentees are committed with JCI, I always ask them: “Could you help in a project? Do you want to run a JCI position?”. If they answer YES and they try to do their best, they are on the right track.

  

 

   22   Merit WASSENAAR


# 70525   JCI Estonia

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Mentoring is the key! I have had mentors while my presidential year and it was very helpful. Later, I have been mentor for new members and also existing members when they take bigger roles.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Being mentor is the best way to use my best practice and give back to JCI.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Openness, being tolerant, seeing the big picture.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Mentee should be sincerely interested in mentoring and showing initiative – asking questions etc

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

This helps our organisation to survive and grow.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

No.

  

   21   Filipe CARRERA


# 68039   JCI Portugal – JC Lisbon

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

JCI changed my personal and professional life, because of many of challenging experiences and interacting with interesting people of all continents. After that is impossible to be the same person.

Of course, during my 15 years in JCI I met people that were my mentors even though they didn’t see themselves as my mentors, by their advises, actions and words they influence me to be better.

I believe if there was a formal mentorship program in JCI my progress would be faster and with less bumps.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

As a college professor, as speaker and as trainer, I was in touch with thousands of people across more than 50 countries in 4 continents. From the feedback I had during more the 20 years doing this, I believe that I had a positive impact in many people and even some of those ask me to be a mentor in a more or less formal way.

What I like the most in being a mentor is seeing people growing in front of my eyes, that is the best payment you can have.
I believe that I can be a mentor to senators and members in my areas of expertise: Networking, Communication, Trainer the trainer, Leadership and Digital Transformation of Humans.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Having a relevant life experience, active listening and out of the box thinking.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Openness from both sides. Don’t believe that you are always right. Be critical in a polite way.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

To the mentor it gives the opportunity to get in touch with people that are different from what he is used to deal every day.
To the mentee it gives the possibility of a road map to success and happiness.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

I met in different countries and years people that I trained in Syria before the war, that after came to me and said how important it was, the skills that I shared with them in order to rebuild their life and find again happiness. You can’t imagine how rewarded and happy I felt each one of these moments.

  

   20   Isabelle GILLE


# 58533   JCI France – JC Charleville-Mézières

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Mes mentors ont été des past-présidents nationaux : Yannick Moati, Guy Blérot, Alexandre Matsakis lorsque j’ai approché et vécu la sphère nationale. Au niveau local, 2 sénateurs : Alain Duval et Jacques Wuilmet, au niveau régional : Jean Marie Boyer ont été des modèles.

Leurs attitudes : engagement, humilité, responsabilité, solidarité, disponibilité, fidélité m’ont beaucoup inspiré. Ils m’ont aidé, pour certains par leurs discours et la nature de leurs actions ; pour d’autres en m’écoutant, en me conseillant. Sans leur présence, je ne serai jamais allée jusqu’à la présidence Nationale : ils ont nourri ma confiance, j’ai osé me surpasser !

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

J’ai pu accompagner des membres au niveau local, régional et national. Concrètement je les ai écoutés, j’ai répondu à leurs questions, parfois, je les ai formés. Souvent je les ai rassurés. Nelson Mandela, Martin Luther King sont toujours de réelles sources d’inspiration pour ma part. Être « mentor « est une vraie source de bonheur. Voir évoluer, grandir ceux que j’ai pu accompagner me procure une joie profonde. Se sentir utile, pouvoir transmettre un peu de mon expérience me motive.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

 L’écoute, l’enthousiasme, le non jugement, la disponibilité.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Laisser le mentoré libre de ses décisions, et les respecter quelles qu’elles soient. Accepter de ne pas être entendu en tant que mentor. Laisser du temps au mentoré. Se mettre d’accord sur l’objectif attendu par le mentoré et sur le mode de fonctionnement du binôme (fréquence des rencontres, nature des sujets abordés…).

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Le mentoring permet réellement de développer le leadership des membres. Il permet au mentor de prendre du recul sur sa propre expérience.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Je n’ai pas d’exemple en particulier, mais des visages souriants de membres devenus présidents locaux, puis régionaux, puis délégué des sénateurs tel qu’Yvon Jezegou de ma JCE de Charleville-Mézières.

  

   19   Peter BROWNING


# 49104   JCI United Kingdom

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I have never been mentored.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

In my professional life I have mentored ‘Total Quality’ trainers and coaches in the UK and the US from very varied backgrounds. I have also mentored Operations Directors and other senior staff in many industries. In JCI I have mentored LOM Presidents. I find it very fulfilling seeing people develop and “blossom”. I have a very wide experience of many industries and sectors as both a general manager, director and management consultant. Process improvement, procurement, change and communication are also areas I have a lot of experience of.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

To listen. To act as a “mirror”. To ask open questions. To be able to challenge in a non-judgmental manner and move people out of their comfort zone. To be open to new situations and tactful. To admit when you do not know something. To help the mentee to reach their own conclusion about the best way forward. Above all to build rapport.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Respect for each other. Mentors should not “tell” what to do. Mentees should not expect a “ready-made” solution.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

They all learn and develop.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Seeing someone who was dyslexic and lacking in self-confidence develop into a respected “total quality” trainer/coach who could stand in front of a Senior Management group. When a union shop steward asked me as a member of the HQ top team to coach him.

  

   18   Dana LIPKOVA


# 77237   JCI Slovakia

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Mentoring has been very helpful to me during my JCI life. I got a lot of support from people within JCI Austria where I have been active (in addition to JCI Slovakia). But also, colleagues such as Marcus Tschann, Heinrich Wittmann or Armin Müller have given me very useful advice and ideas. As JCI is a very complex organisation with so many possibilities, it is important to have a mentor by the side to guide you. Without not having been mentored, I would have probably been lost. In my work life I also have a mentor who I exchange ideas with or who gives me advice and that is very helpful too.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Mentoring has been very helpful to me during my JCI life. I got a lot of support from people within JCI Austria where I have been active (in addition to JCI Slovakia). But also, colleagues such as Marcus Tschann, Heinrich Wittmann or Armin Müller have given me very useful advice and ideas. As JCI is a very complex organisation with so many possibilities, it is important to have a mentor by the side to guide you. Without not having been mentored, I would have probably been lost. In my work life I also have a mentor who I exchange ideas with or who gives me advice and that is very helpful too.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Experience, social skills, empathy, communication skills.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Trust. For the mentee to open up and speak about all different issues freely and for a mentor having a certain portion of sensitivity to best understand the needs of the mentee in order to give the best advice possible. A mentor should give his/her advice, be some kind of a mirror to the mentee (not telling him what to do) because the mentee should find his way and answers to his questions by him/herself.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Trust. For the mentee to open up and speak about all different issues freely and for a mentor having a certain portion of sensitivity to best understand the needs of the mentee in order to give the best advice possible. A mentor should give his/her advice, be some kind of a mirror to the mentee (not telling him what to do) because the mentee should find his way and answers to his questions by him/herself.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

It was a very joyful moment for me when I was given the Senatorship by JCI Slovakia at the National Convention last year and Heinrich Wittmann was there for me (coming all the way from Germany to Slovakia).


   

   17   Laurent DUMONTEIL


# 73646   JCI France – JC Arras

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I did not particularly have a mentor around me. Rather, I used encounters and personalities like those who would build my ideology of the movement. Conversely, I have known people who, by contrast, have constructed the resistant image I wanted of the movement: this movement that brings freedom and liberated democracy.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

The term “Mentor” bothers me. However, the last experience was to support a candidate for the supreme election of our national organization. I simply guided his steps, accompanied by his team. Senators must, as we know, answer simply when they are solicited.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Modesty, experience, withdrawal.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

What is important for the user is to be able to hear the advice and to form his own opinion.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

A single value which is that of the transmission and a purpose the elevation.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

I don’t have any « special » memory.

  

   16   Ali AKAL


# 55258   JCI Turkey – JC Ankara

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I am sorry that I was not fortunate to have a mentor in my JCI life in Turkey, due to the young nature of the JCI Turkey. However, in the international environment, I had Senator Henry Agnelly (# 08440), who guided me during my ASE life.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I have 30 years of JCI experience, and most probably I guided the Junior Members for 25 years in the Parliamentary procedures.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Be positive and trustful.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Do whatever you teach, learning by doing.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Knowledge and historical background.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

1995 WC in Glasgow, when I was the National President of JCI Turkey, I enjoyed practising Parliamentary procedures at the General Assembly.

Henry Agnelly  # 08440 – Monaco & Ali Akal

  

   15   Sisko KÄRKI


# 52703   JCI Finland – JC Oulu

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

We did speak and act earlier in JCI about giving the best possible start to our successor, mainly in different JCI positions. There was an annual routine in every JCI level… Curiosity.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Career coaching, networking steps, agile development steps, change management, facilitation, co-creation…

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

The skill to listen and ask open questions. More than giving own answers, sharing experiences is OK, but not to strong… Every person and case are soooo different. Solution focus, positive approach, very much coaching skills.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Curiosity, open dialog, interaction on all levels, constructive feedback <> confidence/trust.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Support to own development – for both.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Did start my mentoring “career” at University with graduate students. And the year after, one lady attended my own business development program.

  

   14   Marc de TIENNE


# 64636   JCI Belgium – JC Nivelles

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

When I was Regional President and National Executive Vice President of JCI Belgium in 2002-2003 I benefited from the advice of the Regional Past-President in the moments of « loneliness » that no doubt any president in office meets when he is disappointed with the lack of commitment of his teammates. Listening and empathy are the keys that lead to feeling calm, and also to relativize the importance of worries. Without this mentoring or support, I would have felt depressed.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

As a national and international trainer, I have served, and still serve today, as a mentor and coach for many apprentice trainers, for many other training participants as well, in their daily practice. Many young people, especially from Morocco and Tunisia, have adopted me as their « big brother », and also ask me for advice on all aspects of life: professional, associative and even sentimental. This role of mentor probably comes from the combination of my skills and my generous personality. I guide young people in their careers, and for trainers, in their art of training adults. Through my job as a Learning and Development Advisor and my Career Coach Diploma, I strive to stay at the forefront of knowledge. It is above all an activity of connecting young people with confidence in themselves and their abilities.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Confidentiality, trust, listening, art of asking the right questions, patience, positive mindset, solution focus.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Trust, trust, trust. Confidence. Honesty, frankness, ‘contract’ clear. Humility. The mentor learns a lot from the coachee too. The mentees don’t have to believe the mentor all the time. They have to test and to find their own way to be or to do better.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Continuity and empowerment, high level of commitment, added value of the association.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

At a JCI Presenter + Trainer in southern Tunisia, I had the pleasure of meeting and accompanying a young person with a big stutter. With encouragement during the training and a follow-up over several years, to connect this young man with a better self-esteem, I had the chance to see him creating and run a club speaking in his city, and giving some training sessions. A few months ago, he called me on the phone, and there was no trace of stuttering in his voice. What a pride for me and for him.

  

   13   Poul AGERTOFT


# 43249   JCI Denmark – JC Kolding

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I have not been seriously involved in this.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

It was just a not binding agreement, so no one felt responsible.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

It demands real involvement and enthusiasm.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

A sort of friendship.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Sometimes you get a better continuity and avoid failures, but on the other hand JCI is a place for learning by doing.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

No, I don’t have any special memory.

  

   12   Danielle CESAROV-ZAUGG


# 46845   JCI Switzerland – JC Bern

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Our aim in 2000 was to establish JCI Serbia. We encouraged young Rotaracter to create the first JCI LOM in Novi Sad and Belgrade. In 2003 JCI Serbia was accepted in JCI. They need a lot of understanding and support when they are confronted with problems on site. That is the reason why we never stopped to be beside them and to award the best new member with a card to the next EUCO.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

To be of help when needed and encouraging the mentee – and then to let them work on their own.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Trust and openness.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Success in what they are doing.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

 I love JCI Serbia and the people – they are very active and successful – despite some normal obstacles.

  

   11   Mechel VISSER


# 71810   JCI The Netherlands – JC Ijmond

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Indeed, I had a mentor when I first joined local JCI chamber. Very useful support, not just on JCI subjects, how all works etc, but also for introducing to other Jaycees. Later I had another mentor who inspired me to become active in the national organization. Guess we need supporters to get started/ keep motivated and a mentor was quite useful for that.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I want to share my learnings, my successes, want to help youngsters have a great experience within JCI too. This is two way, the mentee, but also the helping also satisfies the mentor, myself, and make me realize even more what a wonderful organization we have! Where ended, of course I would mentor newcomers! The experience is broad, from leading teams, to organizing events, to coaching individuals…

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Mutual respect and active listening skills. Mentoring is about sharing, not sending information.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Mutual respect.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Share and learn, keep the spirit alive, broaden networks.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Too many!

  

  

   10   Irina USIUKEVICH


# 64850   JCI Ukraine – JC Minsk

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

These were 2 remarkable JCI persons: Reginald Schaumans (the coach of my 14th Academy in Takamatsu (Japan) – needless to say about this fantastic person (RIP). It seems I could talk to him all my life… and Lars Hajslund, when he was not the JCI WP yet.

When Lars first came to Minsk, Belarus in 2001 I have told him that he will be the WP in few years. He impressed me (and all of us – JC Belarus team). In several years he became 2006 JCI WP. These 2 persons are absolutely different with age and temper, but they are both wise, honest and always had time to talk and give advice.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I do not think I can be a mentor. I do not think this can be learned. One should have a certain charisma, be respected and trusted by people. Then your one honest word can change somebody’s life.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Mind, reputation, sense of humour, compassion.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Honesty, trust. For mentors: do not teach! For mentees: divide everything said by 10 and trust your intuition!

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Saving time. The sooner young people get smart advice or see a vivid example, the faster they will achieve their goals.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

I cannot call this person « a mentor », but he gave me the main « kick » in my life. I was 24, working as a teacher of English at a secondary school, living with parents, lack of money… We were several girlfriends, who were visiting a small cafe in historical part of Minsk almost every evening, chatting, laughing, flirting – « wind in the mind »:-) In this place there was one very remarkable person, whom everybody called « Michael the Frenchman ». He was a jeweller – rather handsome man on about 50 years old. He was looking like mafia man (I am sure he was the one:-), sitting at the best table, talking just few words during the evening. One evening I was told by the waiter, that Michael has invited me to come to his table. I was excited and scared. The reason was very simple – he was interested in my earrings. These were really old and nice silver earrings, nice shape, shining, my aunt’s gift to me. He asked to have a look at them and after some examining, he explained the nature of their bright shining – they were made of so-called lead glass – the material from which the best fake diamonds are made. We talked the whole evening quite easily and friendly – about jewellery, arts, style, any. But at the end of the evening, unexpectedly, with very serious and almost angry voice he said: « You are already 24 years old and you still live with your parents, and you cannot fully support yourself. That’s shameful. Fix your life right now! » Then he left. That was shocking and unexpected after such a nice talk. We never spoke again, only greeted from afar. In 2 weeks, I have left my job at school, found better on in Belarusian-American Joint Venture, where my salary became 3 times higher and my life career began.

  

   09   Silva DOLMANE


# 70830   JCI Latvia – JC Riga

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I am not really sure that I got real JCI mentorship in my early JCI life. I was too active myself and made the road up to NP without real mentorship. For the international level I had mentorship on personal level not JCI.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I have never announced myself as a mentor, and never officially have participated in any mentorship program. However, I have always been open to my experience sharing and have helped with my contacts and information to anyone who was looking for that.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Experience and knowledge in certain area, passion for JCI, examples from their own life.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

For mentees – do not be afraid to ask questions and to open the doors to unknown. For mentors – find the right approach and the main need for mentee how to fulfil his interest and keep member for a long time.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

  1. Involvement in all levels, even if you are senator and not anymore active in projects;
  2. Experience and knowledge exchange are always good and maybe from this contact grows nice friendship or business partnership;
  3. Mentorship program is strengthening organisation. There is saying that the chain is as strong as the weakest part but if we improve our members, newcomers, we become all stronger.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Some external pushing is needed for most of us. Without that most probably I would not become NP and more than sure never International VP.

  

  

  

   08   Tom COMMEINE


# 72743   JCI Belgium – JC Houtland

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I’m blessed that one of my mentors has made it clear to me that we all need at least one, and preferably more, of these type of people in our life: heroes, mentors, role models, coaches and trainers. The most valuable lessons were repeated, with different words and different examples: « You have to BE before you can DO, you have to DO before you can HAVE », « You can have everything in life you want, if you’ll just help enough other people get what they want. » , « Do Whatever It Takes. » , « Never be a quitter. » , « Always celebrate wins. » , « Be positive, be better. » , « Whatever you can think about, whatever you can imagine, you can make happen. » , « Money is never the problem, resourcefulness is. » , « Wanna grow a big organisation? It’s simple: invite people. », « Meet strangers! Meet people you don’t know! Forget mama’s advice that said: don’t talk to strangers. Remember that EVERYTHING you want now is owned by someone else, by some stranger, by someone you still have to meet. » , « It’s not the problem that it’s too expensive, the problem is that you’re not earning enough, so be creative and find ways to earn more. » , « Live a life of abundance, not of scarcity. There’s abundance all over. » …

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Zig Ziglar motivated me back in 2001 during my training in Dusseldorf Germany. He said: « Don’t just start training our trainings. Become a mentor to the people you get in touch with, your family, your friends, your social network, your clients, and give, give, give. The laws of nature say that if you give, you’ll get back. The better you give, the better you’ll get back. Just stay yourself. You don’t want to become the next Zig Ziglar, be yourself, become your best self and create your own way. » I followed Zig Ziglar’s advice. I got from being a mentor the heart-warming feeling that people became much more successful, mostly without realising how much my influence contributed and, in many cases, still contributes to their success; and that’s awesome.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Giving attitude, good communication. Ideas + inspiration. Guidance.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Ideas, thoughts, can be life changing. Inspiration combined with ideas and action can turn into miracles.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Accelerated learning, creating, achieving.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

The many young people that were in touch with me over the years, that I shared ideas with, thoughts with, sparked ideas with them, inspired them and who have become member of JCI all over the world, from Norway to Australia and Singapore and have developed a most successful, wonderful personal life, family life and career. So, heart-warming. There are also the people I met in JCI and became friends over the years, and I’m sure I learned a lot from them as they did from me, without us naming it mentoring.

  

  

   07   Ilona GÖRÖG

# 53644   JCI Romania – JC Tirgu Mures

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I am grateful to Hans Richard Damli (JCI Norway) – he was the first who brought the idea of JCI in my hometown, Tirgu Mures, and mentored the creation of the first JCI LOM there. For the further development, the mentoring from JCEF members (France) was essential for me (for us), as we were the first JCI generation in Romania.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I could not say that I did proper mentoring till now, but I continued to support younger colleagues from Tirgu Mures and Brasov, when I concluded my membership at 41 yr., till, unfortunately, the organization stopped its activity.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

To be supportive, be open to share the experience, but also receptive for new needs/circumstances.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Trust, and mutual respect.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Creates bridges between generations, perpetuates values and organizational knowledge and strengthens the sense of belonging to a “family”.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Excursions and social evenings in Romania and France.

  

   06   Charlotte GREGORY

# 72298   JCI Malta  

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I was very lucky in having a great past National President that was my mentor, he is still very much a person that I look up to today. When I attended my first World Congress in Tunisia in 2009, I saw JCI in a totally different light and I wanted to learn so much more about the organization. Chris Mallia at the time was IPP and he had told me if you want to learn about the organization you need to attend GA, he sat next to me explained what each person’s role was, how the organization worked etc. I can truly say that although I had already been a JCI member for 3 years it is only then that I realized what a great organization JCI was. In the week we were there I tried to do as much as I can and I thank that for my first JCI Presenter course I had a great trainer that challenged me on so many levels. In all fairness I miss that time when for me the organization was a different one and self-development and networking was still the core of the organisation. I was then lucky to have met Mariella MacLeod we were co-chairs for the EC2014 held in Malta and her knowledge of the organisation and leadership changed me for the better.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I have never been asked officially to be a mentor of a JCI member however I think that I did help a few. Two people stand out for me, one was an entrepreneur who did not believe in himself and refused to participate in certain events as he was dyslexic and I remember helping him embrace it instead of fearing it. We met a few years ago, he now exports to more than 7 countries and he told me you remember that day that you helped me realize that I should embrace what I am, thank you so much I have moved on so much since then. To me that was one of the best JCI moments.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Empathy, a good listener, available, collaboration and truly believing in the organization.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Respect each other, if there is no respect the relationship will not work. Embrace the knowledge of your mentor as a mentee and the mentor should also embrace the mentee’s energy and inquisitiveness.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Self-development, friendships that last a life time, more active members, a stronger community.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Please see above.

  

   05   Toivo AALJA

# 53657   JCI Estonia – JC Tallinn

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Officially I haven’t had any mentors, but I have had many good advisors from all over the world in my JCI life and also in business life. Most I value is their advice to stay yourself, to listen your inner voice, keep clear mind and happy heart.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I have been asked to be a mentor for JCI member for period of one year. It was a good experience to feel trust and full acceptance. I could be a mentor in many fields like business administration, leadership, communication, sales, marketing etc.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Having practical experience in fields mentor is acting.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Relationship has to be very open, honest and kind for both.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

Human value.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Unfortunately, I do not remember any specific memories.

  

  

   04   Claude DUPRAS

# 01889   JCI France & JCI Canada – JC Montreal  

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I joined the “Chambre de commerce des jeunes in Montréal” during a recruiting campaign. It was he French unit in the city. I met at that time members of the “Young Men Section of the Montreal Board of Trade” which was the name of the English unit in Montreal. That is where I met Phil Pugsley who created the JCI Senatorship. He was very impressive and he was the one who first motivated me to be very active in the movement. If I would not have been a member of the JCI my life would surely have been totally different.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I motivated many young men in Montreal to be become member of la “Jeune Chambre”. I delegated many responsibilities, helped them get elected to important posts, etc. For example, we invited Fidel Castro in Montreal a few months after he took power in Cuba. He accepted and came. More than 50 members where involved in the organization of the two day-visit. It was very intense and a great success. Our JCI unit had 1 500 members.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

To recognize the capacity and the needs of a new member. And to help him accordingly.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Confidence and follow up. Friendship evidently. Help them by example. Delegate responsibilities larger than the one they think they can handle.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

It is motivation and confidence in the future. Try to show them where they will be in a few years. Like at this time, a new unit is been created in Montreal. The leaders came to talk to me. I tried to convince them and show them where they would be in a few years as individuals.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Phil Pugsley organized small reunions regularly to discuss the importance of confidence in oneself and showed examples of success. For me public speaking was an example. In the beginning, I was shy to talk in public or to a group to give my opinion or propose an idea. A few later I was talking to groups of 500 persons. I did not believe it but it was true.

  

  

   03   Alma KARABEG

# 76398   JCI Norway – JC Evolution Trondheim

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

I did not have a dedicated official mentor, but in my contact with experienced people I asked for advice and some of them functioned are regular advice-providers. Mostly, I needed an experienced and wise person for discussion. The advice I got inspired me and made me take my next steps. I think mentoring gives courage. Many times, we have the answer ourselves, but we need to be encouraged to pursue them too.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

When I functioned as a mentor it was to share my knowledge and experience. It should be valuable to more people than just myself.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

It is important not to influence the mentee and not to lead the mentee to take action that I would take if I was in their position. A mentor needs to stay neutral, share his/her experience and ask guiding questions to help the mentee to clarify what he/she wants to do. A mentor needs to have patience and should not use the mentee to achieve his/her own unlived dreams.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Mutual respect for mentee and mentor is important. It is time-consuming to be a mentor so it is important to have clear boundaries how much time is available.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

The mentee can learn faster about JCI from a mentor, in particular if aiming for some positions. JCI can become a stronger network due to mentoring.

Do you have any special or joyful memory from the mentorship? Share with us, please.

Mostly remembering different stories and narratives from others experience.

  

   02   Marc GIMFERRER

# 70235   JCI Catalonia – JC Barcelona

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

It helped me to understand better the organization and its dynamics, which gave me confidence to pursue higher goals within JCI.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

Helping others and making them grow is what inspires me. I could mentor on JCI as NGO, JCI Catalonia specifics, project management and leadership.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Experience, knowledge, empathy, open minded.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

Trust each other, gain confidence and reassure confidentiality also of what is being discussed between the two of us.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

A lot of value as in our organization each member change roles every year and the knowledge is easy and quick to gain, but also quick to lose as the members can disappear quite fast as in a few years you may give a lot to the organization and often he or she gets burned out and could disappear quite suddenly from the association, which is a huge loss of know-how and organizational culture and values.

  

  

  
   01   Patrizia RONCONI

# 49289   JCI Italy – JC Varese

What is your experience as a mentee? What support did you get from your mentor? How did this mentoring help you? What would be different in your JCI life if you hadn’t been mentored?

Since my first meeting in JCI, I had Senators (mentors) who welcomed me, made that I felt part of the group and explained to me the organization, its goals, its values, its structure, the program and the projects of the LOM.

They were so good at passing on their passion and their love for this association that I immediately became passionate about it.

They also helped me to learn how to work on a project, they supported me with advices on how to deal with « project planning » which was something really new more than 35 years ago!

Other mentors helped me the first years with public speaking, team building, leadership, how to found a LOM, trainer skills and leadership skills.

I especially remember a mentor, a professional trainer, a Senator from Belgium, who taught me a lot in the field of trainings. We conducted together a training in Tarragona (JCI Catalunya). He gave me so many advices, he motivated me and he considered me as a professional trainer asking for my opinion on what we were doing. And that was my first international training! That was an awesome experience, especially if we consider that nowadays my profession is to be a trainer!

Everything would have been different if these people would not have been there!  I don’t know if I would have achieved the goals I have achieved, but certainly I would not have reached the level of competence that I have reached.

Describe your experience as a mentor. What (or who) inspired you to be a mentor? What did you get yourself from being a mentor? What do you like most about being a mentor? On which fields/areas could you be a mentor for senators/members?

I was inspired to be a mentor thanks to the mentors who helped me at the beginning and all the times I needed their help in my JCI career. To become a mentor was, in my opinion, the best way to say « thank you » to what they did for me.

Being a mentor gave me and continues to give me the enormous satisfaction of being able to pass on to others what I learned both in JCI and professionally and to see people grow in JCI and professionally.

Due to my experience in JCI and in my professions, I could be a mentor in several fields like: trainings, leadership/management/organization, communication/networking, HR skills evaluation and recruitment.

In your opinion, which qualities are most important to be a mentor?

Empathy, good communication skills, good ability to explain things, good ability to interact with young people, and – of course – knowledge and deep experience in some skills and good advices to transmit.

What is most significant in the relationship between mentor and mentee? What suggestions do you have for mentors? And for mentees?

The most significant: trust and respect of both sides.

To mentors: tell young members that you are available to answer questions or for advices.

To mentees: don’t hesitate to ask questions, ask for advices.

In your opinion, what value gives mentoring to JCI, to the mentor, and to the mentee?

A huge value, a unique value, that can hardly be found in other associations.

It’s a complete WIN-WIN situation where everybody comes out enriched. The mentor still feels involved in the association and the mentee found a point of reference to help him to grow.